Pinoy Pet Finder
June 19, 2019, 07:41:22 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar Login Register  



Pinoy Pet Finder is not related to and does not endorse any product or service being advertised.
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: ACS History & Breed Standard  (Read 7533 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
amang
Global Moderator
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 15693


« on: March 26, 2009, 04:59:34 AM »


Cocker Spaniel History

The Spaniel family is a large one of considerable antiquity. As far back as the 14th century we have mention of the Spanyell, which came to be divided into water and land spaniels, with further divisions in land spaniels based on size. "Cockers" were the smaller of the two types of spaniels and are to this day the smallest in the Sporting Group, their name deriving, apparently, from especial proficiency on woodcock. Not until 1883 were classes provided for the breed at English bench shows, and not until 1892 was the breed given breed status in England's Kennel Clubs stud book.

The Cocker has been exhibited in the US since the early 1880's. As developed here, however, the American Cocker has evolved somewhat differently in type, size, and coloring from the breed now recognized as the English Cocker Spaniel. Field trials for the breed in the US were started by the parent Field Trial Club in the 1920s, and the Cocker's inherent desire to hunt renders him a capable gun dog when judiciously trained. The Cocker covers all territory within gun range speedily, flushing game and retrieving only when under command, as a rule taking to water readily. From the moment it hit the show ring, however, the Cocker has engaged audiences and remains one of the most popular AKC breeds.



KC MEET THE BREEDS®: Cocker Spaniel

Exhibited in the US since the 1880s, the Cocker Spaniel remains one of the most popular breeds according to AKC® registration statistics. The Cocker has a sturdy, compact body and a silky, flat or wavy coat. He is a merry, well-balanced dog that is capable of considerable speed and great endurance. Cocker Spaniels can be black, black with tan points, parti-colored or any solid color other than black (ASCOB).

A Look Back
As far back as the 14th Century there is mention of the Spanyell, which came to be divided into water and land spaniels. "Cockers" are the smallest of the spaniels and the Sporting Group. The American Cocker has evolved somewhat differently in appearance from the breed now recognized as the English Cocker Spaniel. His desire to hunt renders him a capable gun dog; he covers territory speedily, flushing game and retrieving only when under command. He takes to water readily.

Right Breed for You?
Despite their small size, the Cocker Spaniel is still an active Sporting breed that needs daily exercise. Regular brushing and a trim every few months helps keep the coat free of mats. Cockers are intelligent, gentle dogs that thrive as part of a family.

If you are considering purchasing a Cocker Spaniel puppy, learn more here.

    * Sporting Group; AKC recognized in 1878.
    * Average size: from 13 ½ inches to 15 ½ inches at the shoulder.
    * Family pet, hunting dog.

© The American Kennel Club, Inc.

Cocker Spaniel Breed Standard
Sporting Group

General Appearance
The Cocker Spaniel is the smallest member of the Sporting Group. He has a sturdy, compact body and a cleanly chiseled and refined head, with the overall dog in complete balance and of ideal size. He stands well up at the shoulder on straight forelegs with a topline sloping slightly toward strong, moderately bent, muscular quarters. He is a dog capable of considerable speed, combined with great endurance. Above all, he must be free and merry, sound, well balanced throughout and in action show a keen inclination to work. A dog well balanced in all parts is more desirable than a dog with strongly contrasting good points and faults.

SIZE, PROPORTION, STANDARD




Size
-The ideal height at the withers for an adult dog is 15 inches and for an adult bitch, 14 inches. Height may vary one-half inch above or below this ideal. A dog whose height exceeds 15-1/2 inches or a bitch whose height exceeds 14-1/2 inches shall be disqualified. An adult dog whose height is less than 14-1/2 inches and an adult bitch whose height is less than 13-1/2 inches shall be penalized. Height is determined by a line perpendicular to the ground from the top of the shoulder blades, the dog standing naturally with its forelegs and lower hind legs parallel to the line of measurement

Proportion-The measurement from the breast bone to back of thigh is slightly longer than the measurement from the highest point of withers to the ground. The body must be of sufficient length to permit a straight and free stride; the dog never appears long and low.

« Last Edit: May 16, 2009, 06:10:50 AM by amang » Logged
Pinoy Pet Finder
« on: March 26, 2009, 04:59:34 AM »

 Logged
amang
Global Moderator
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 15693


« Reply #1 on: May 16, 2009, 05:47:27 AM »



THE HEAD

 

To attain a well proportioned head, which must be in balance with the rest of the dog, it embodies the following:

Expression-The expression is intelligent, alert, soft and appealing.

Eyes-Eyeballs are round and full and look directly forward. The shape of the eye rims gives a slightly almond shaped appearance; the eye is not weak or goggled. The color of the iris is dark brown and in general the darker the better.

Ears-Lobular, long, of fine leather, well feathered, and placed no higher than a line to the lower part of the eye.

Skull-Rounded but not exaggerated with no tendency toward flatness; the eyebrows are clearly defined with a pronounced stop. The bony structure beneath the eyes is well chiseled with no prominence in the cheeks.
The muzzle is broad and deep, with square even jaws. To be in correct balance, the distance from the stop to the tip of the nose is one half the distance from the stop up over the crown to the base of the skull.

Nose-of sufficient size to balance the muzzle and foreface, with well developed nostrils typical of a sporting dog. It is black in color in the blacks, black and tans, and black and whites; in other colors it may be brown, liver or black, the darker the better. The color of nose harmonizes with the color of the eye rim.

Lips-The upper lip is full and of sufficient depth to cover the lower jaw.

Teeth-Teeth strong and sound, not too small and meet in a scissors bite.
« Last Edit: May 16, 2009, 05:58:55 AM by amang » Logged
amang
Global Moderator
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 15693


« Reply #2 on: May 16, 2009, 05:56:02 AM »



Neck, Topline, Body

Neck-The neck is sufficiently long to allow the nose to reach the ground easily, muscular and free from pendulous "throatiness." It rises strongly from the shoulders and arches slightly as it tapers to join the head.

Topline-sloping slightly toward muscular quarters.

Body-The chest is deep, its lowest point no higher than the elbows, its front sufficiently wide for adequate heart and lung space, yet not so wide as to interfere with the straightforward movement of the forelegs. Ribs are deep and well sprung. Back is strong and sloping evenly and slightly downward from the shoulders to the set-on of the docked tail. The docked tail is set on and carried on a line with the topline of the back, or slightly higher; never straight up like a Terrier and never so low as to indicate timidity. When the dog is in motion the tail action is merry.    
« Last Edit: May 16, 2009, 05:58:35 AM by amang » Logged
amang
Global Moderator
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 15693


« Reply #3 on: May 16, 2009, 06:00:29 AM »



 

The Forequarters


The shoulders are well laid back forming an angle with the upper arm of approximately 90 degrees which permits the dog to move his forelegs in an easy manner with forward reach. Shoulders are clean-cut and sloping without protrusion and so set that the upper points of the withers are at an angle which permits a wide spring of rib. When viewed from the side with the forelegs vertical, the elbow is directly below the highest point of the shoulder blade. Forelegs are parallel, straight, strongly boned and muscular and set close to the body well under the scapulae. The pasterns are short and strong. Dewclaws on forelegs may be removed. Feet compact, large, round and firm with horny pads; they turn neither in nor out.
   
« Last Edit: May 16, 2009, 06:03:20 AM by amang » Logged
amang
Global Moderator
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 15693


« Reply #4 on: May 16, 2009, 06:03:06 AM »



 

The Hindquarters

Hips are wide and quarters well rounded and muscular. When viewed from behind, the hind legs are parallel when in motion and at rest. The hind legs are strongly boned, and muscled with moderate angulation at the stifle and powerful, clearly defined thighs. The stifle is strong and there is no slippage of it in motion or when standing. The hocks are strong and well let down. Dewclaws on hind legs may be removed.
Logged
amang
Global Moderator
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 15693


« Reply #5 on: May 16, 2009, 06:15:22 AM »

Colors and Markings

Black Variety-



Solid color black to include black with tan points. The black should be jet; shadings of brown or liver in the coat are not desirable. A small amount of white on the chest and/or throat is allowed; white in any other location shall disqualify.

Any Solid Color Other than Black (ASCOB)-



Any solid color other than black, ranging from lightest cream to darkest red, including brown and brown with tan points. The color shall be of a uniform shade, but lighter color of the feathering is permissible. A small amount of white on the chest and/or throat is allowed; white in any other location shall disqualify.

Parti-Color Variety-



Two or more solid, well broken colors, one of which must be white; black and white, red and white ( the red may range from lightest cream to darkest red), brown and white, and roans, to include any such color combination with tan points. It is preferable that the tan markings be located in the same pattern as for the tan points in the Black and ASCOB varieties. Roans are classified as parti-colors and may be of any of the usual roaning patterns. Primary color which is ninety percent (90%) or more shall disqualify.

Tan Points-The color of the tan may be from the lightest cream to the darkest red and is restricted to ten percent (10%) or less of the color of the specimen; tan markings in excess of that amount shall disqualify. In the case of tan points in the Black or ASCOB variety, the markings shall be located as follows:

1) A clear tan spot over each eye;
2) On the sides of the muzzle and on the cheeks;
3) On the underside of the ears;
4) On all feet and/or legs;
5) Under the tail;
6) On the chest, optional; presence or absence shall not be penalized.
Tan markings which are not readily visible or which amount only to traces, shall be penalized. Tan on the muzzle which extends upward, over and joins shall also be penalized. The absence of tan markings in the Black or ASCOB variety in any of the specified locations in any otherwise tan-pointed dog shall disqualify.
Logged
amang
Global Moderator
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 15693


« Reply #6 on: May 16, 2009, 06:17:11 AM »

GAIT



The Cocker Spaniel, though the smallest of the sporting dogs, possesses a typical sporting dog gait. Prerequisite to good movement is balance between the front and rear assemblies. He drives with strong, powerful rear quarters and is properly constructed in the shoulders and forelegs so that he can reach forward without constriction in a full stride to counterbalance the driving force from the rear. Above all, his gait is coordinated, smooth and effortless. The dog must cover ground with his action; excessive animation should not be mistaken for proper gait.
Logged
amang
Global Moderator
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 15693


« Reply #7 on: May 16, 2009, 06:18:41 AM »

TEMPERAMENT

Equable in temperament with no suggestion of timidity.

Disqualifications

Height-Males over 15-1/2 inches; females over 14-1/2 inches.
Color and Markings-The aforementioned colors are the only acceptable colors or combination of colors. Any other colors or combination of colors to disqualify.

Black Variety-White markings except on chest and throat.
Any Solid Color Other Than Black Variety-White markings except on chest and throat.
Parti-color Variety-Primary color ninety percent (90%) or more. Tan Points(1) Tan markings in excess of ten percent (10%); (2) Absence of tan markings in Black or ASCOB Variety in any of the specified locations in an otherwise tan pointed dog.
   
Logged
ramkachiz
Full Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 117


« Reply #8 on: September 18, 2009, 11:41:23 PM »

galing naman nang info...
Logged
amang
Global Moderator
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 15693


« Reply #9 on: September 17, 2010, 12:42:57 PM »

If you want some advice, here it goes:  You can take your chances with heads, with hindquarters, bites, even with temperament, but NEVER use bad shoulders in your breeding program.  In few generations you can destroy all your years of hard work breeding dogs.

But let me start to explain about the shoulders and all the other important points.  The standard says the shoulders are to form a 90 degree angle with the upper arm.  There is no way to explain this other  than using photos or drawings.


This is the ideal cocker, with proper angulation.  In this drawing you can easily see the proper 90 degree angle, but sometimes we have problems seeing these angles in a "real dog". Well, things will be much easier if you remember to trace an imaginary line from the withers (nothing more than "highest point of the shoulder blade" the standard is talking about) to the ground.  This line MUST TOUCH the dog's elbows. 

Check these photos:



he line touches the withers and elbows at the same time.  It is what the standard means: "when viewed from the side with the forelegs vertical, the elbow is directly below the highest point of the shoulder blade".  Much easier,  right? What else are you able to see on this girl?  Can you see her long neck and short back? Any clue why her neck is long and her back is short? BECAUSE SHE HAS PERFECT SHOULDER ANGULATION! Because her elbows are under the highest point of her shoulder blade. It is exactly what the standard asks for!

Now another puppy.



Like before, I traced a line from the withers to the ground, but this time it isn't even close to the elbows. Why? Because the shoulder angulation is over 90 degrees. And what about the topline?  Can you see the short neck? Can you see the long back from its withers to the tailset?

Now pay attention to the 2nd line I traced, the one from the elbows to the ground. What would happen if the shoulders had proper angulation from its withers were there? This dog would be much shorter in back and with a longer neck, wouldn't it? If you get a cocker magazine and start to trace these lines you will see why people say the fronts are the biggest problem in our breed!

SO, if you want to evaluate your own dog, and if there is no one to stack it for you while you take a look on it.  What to do?  Use your hands! Stack the dog, put your thumb on the withers.  Your little finger should touch the elbows.  Check the photo below


But did you remember when I said bad shoulders will limit dogs movement? Why it happens? Look at the pictures once again:



This time, I traced a line from the withers across to the point where it meets the upper arm and keep a linegoing straight to the ground.  This line is exactly where they will put their foreleg when they are moving. It is the famous REACH!  There is no way the leg can go ahead past that point, and it's not because they don't want to move, don't have attitude or is not being shown by a professional handler, it is because THEY CAN'T GO OVER THAT POINT. Their anatomy doesn't allow them to do that.
Looking at both of them side by side, can you see how the black & tan's shoulders are well laid back, like the standard asks for? So, every time you read or hear something about well laid back shoulders you now know how it should be! Now pay attention to the ground.  The black and tan will be able to put her leg much farther ahead than the black one, right?  It means she will cover much more ground than the other, with a single step. Now imagine the difference it will be in one day working on the fields. But I will talk more about this when I start to work with the GAIT subject.

Just another important thing: When you are watching a dog in movement (especially in a dog show) pay attention to its front legs and on the nose (YES, THE NOSE).  A dog with a good reach will be able to put his foreleg ahead of his nose. If it is not able to do that, it is because it doesn't have a good reach and its has problems with the angles of its shoulders.  Let's see what I am talking about:

This is a Brazilian dog bred by one of my good friends - CH Good Advice Total Eclipse, aka Jordan.



Now Jordan in movement. Can you see his front leg is ahead of his nose?



Now the same photo with some lines so you see better what I am talking about:



It wasn't that difficult, was it?

Now you already know how to evaluate a good head, layback of shoulders & long neck.  Believe me, the head can change, but the shoulders never will.  Bad shoulders never will be good ones.  And the opposite doesn't happen too. Sometimes it can improve A LITTLE, but don't wait for MIRACLES, ok? I have some photos to prove what I am saying.  Take a look at this girl.  Since she was 15 DAYS OLD I was pretty sure how her shoulders should be. DON'T FORGET TO TRACE THE IMAGINARY LINE, ok?


I will repeat this again:To breed good dogs you don't need any luck.  You need KNOWLEDGE. If you are able to understand the standard and visualize how a good dog should be, you will not have any problems learning to breed good dogs.  You just need luck to breed GREAT DOGS, but the decent ones are a piece of cake!

by: Tais Vogastelo - St. James Cocker - Brazil
« Last Edit: September 17, 2010, 12:44:07 PM by amang » Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  



Pinoy Pet Finder is NOT related to and does NOT endorse any product or service being advertised.

Pinoy Pet Finder will not be liable for any losses or damages you may incur resulting from personal dealings in the forum..
We do not guarantee the credibility and integrity of any member in any way. Transact at your own risk.
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP PINOY PET FINDER © 2007-2011
Powered by SMF 1.1.14 | SMF © 2006-2011, Simple Machines LLC
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.076 seconds with 25 queries.

Google visited last this page September 01, 2018, 03:56:51 AM