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Author Topic: Cocker Health Issues..  (Read 12177 times)
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amang
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« on: May 05, 2009, 11:03:47 AM »




Keratoconjunctivitis Sicca (KCS) is a common, potentially blinding condition that develops due to decrease of tear production in the eye.

Some selective breeds of dogs are usually prone to “dry eye” syndrome. They are mainly Cocker spaniel, Shih Tzu, Lhasa Apso, Pekingese, Pug, West Highland White Terrier, Dachshund,Miniature Schnauzer, etc.

Tears do much more than just provide comforting lubrication. They also contain anti-bacterial protein, salts, sugars and oxygen to nourish an area that has no blood supply.
Tears play a major role in flushing away irritants and infectious agents that constantly get into a dogs’ eyes.

Without a continuous and adequate supply of bactericidal tears, bacterial organisms soon overgrow on the eye introducing various degrees of local inflammation soon followed by a dominating gooey yellow discharge and signs of discomfort.

Dog’s having red eye along with yellow discharge, and frequently pawing at eyes, is surely suffering from dry eye syndreme (KCS).

KCS should be treated early, but if left untreated, then it will lead to chronic suffering. In response to chronic KCS, the corneal surface thickens and becomes irregular resulting in pigmentary keratitis which eventually leads to irreversible blindness. Pug, Miniature Schnauzer and Dachshund are especially prone to this form of keratitis.

The most frequent cause is believed to be immune disorder that leads to decrease of watery component of the tear film. Approximately 72% of the dogs with KCS have the disease in both eyes. Othe causes are, Hypothyroidism, Canine Distemper, Chronic viral or bacterial conjunctivitis, Facial nerve trauma, Sulfonamides drugs (used to treat colitis and bacterial infections), and anesthetic agents also temporary reduce tear production.

Treatment of KCS consists of both drug therapy and surgery. Cyclosporine is the drug of choice since 1995, it works by stimulating the tear gland to produce more tears. It is claimed that almost 80% of dogs will increase their normal tearing by Cyclosporine. Antibiotics, mucolytics, and hormones are also used.
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« on: May 05, 2009, 11:03:47 AM »

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amang
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« Reply #1 on: May 05, 2009, 11:14:04 AM »

There's one other thing you should be doing to avoid ear infections in your Cocker Spaniel.



Joanna shows off her shaved earTo improve air circulation to the ear canal, it's important to keep the hair trimmed around the ear so that it doesn't block off the flow of air to the ear.  Shave the area around the entrance to the ear canal, as well as the underside of the ear that hangs down and covers the ear canal entrance.

In the picture on the left, I've lifted Joanna's ear up to show the areas that I've shaved.  (Isn't she a cutie?!?!)  Notice that the hair is shaved not only at the ear canal entrance, but also in all directions around it.

If you'd like to see this in more detail, click on the picture to bring up a larger, higher-resolution version of the photo.

Taking proper steps to avoid ear infections is an important duty for every Cocker Spaniel owner.  If you're not willing to do the work, you should forget the Cocker and get one of those breeds with the ears that stick up instead of hanging down!  Keep in mind that severe ear infections can lead to deafness in your dog, and will cost you serious money at the vet...  so make the effort now to prevent ear infections before they get out of hand.

http://www.zimfamilycockers.com/EarCleaner.html
« Last Edit: May 05, 2009, 11:15:11 AM by amang » Logged
amang
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« Reply #2 on: May 05, 2009, 11:50:12 AM »

# Cherry eyes (prolapsed gland of the third eyelid).  Primarily a cosmetic issue, if you treat it quickly.  Can cost several hundred dollars for surgery.

# Glaucoma and cataracts.  These are serious eye conditions which can lead to blindness.  Sadly, I do hear from quite a few people with an older Cocker who is blind.  Extremely expensive surgery can sometimes improve the vision of a dog with cataracts, but I suspect most dogs with cataracts are allowed to go blind.  Glaucoma treatments must be done over the lifetime of the dog, and get very expensive.  (Suggestion:  If you buy a puppy from a breeder that does CERF testing to their adult dogs, your puppy will be much less likely to have eye problems as an adult.)

# Conjunctivitis (eye infections).  Very common in Cockers.  Not as serious or expensive as some of the other Cocker eye problems, but your vet will make a fair amount off of this, too.

# Distichia (misplaced hair along the edge of the eye, which grow towards the eye and irritate it).  Severe cases can require surgery, which can cost several hundred dollars.



# Autoimmune diseases.

Cockers seem to be more prone to autoimmune diseases then most other dog breeds.  This is extremely serious stuff...  often fatal within a matter of days. be extremely skeptical if your vet suggests vaccinating your dog for DHLPP every year.  Due to concerns that over-vaccinating can cause autoimmune problems, many university veterinary programs now recommend vaccinations every three years rather than yearly.

IMMUNE MEDIATED HEMOLYTIC ANEMIA or “IMHA”
(FORMERLY KNOWN AS AUTOIMMUNE HEMOLYTIC ANEMIA or “AIHA”)

Immune-mediated hemolytic anemia is a condition where the patient’s immune system begins attacking his or her own red blood cells. What occurs on a microscopic level is this: the branch of the immune system that produces antibodies begins to direct them against the patient’s own red blood cells. The red blood cells become quickly coated with tiny antibody proteins, essentially marking these red blood cells for destruction. When too many red blood cells are destroyed the patient is said to be “anemic,” and will feel cold and weak. Because the red blood cells are being destroyed internally (and not lost through bleeding), the patient will become yellow-tinged (“jaundiced”) rather than pale

http://marvistavet.net/html/body_imha.html

https://www.vmth.ucdavis.edu/vmthold/info/vaccinproto.htm
« Last Edit: May 05, 2009, 11:57:02 AM by amang » Logged
amang
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« Reply #3 on: May 14, 2009, 03:12:11 AM »

Cocker spaniel, American

The disorders listed in the first 3 categories below are believed to have an inherited basis, or are known to have a predilection for this breed ("breed predisposition"). This means the disorder occurs more commonly in this breed compared to other breeds, or to the general dog population. Common sense suggests that these are inherited disorders, but for many breeds and many disorders, the studies to determine the mode of inheritance or the frequency in the breed have not been carried out, or are inconclusive.

We have listed disorders for which there is a general consensus among those investigating in this field and among veterinary practitioners, that the condition is significant in this breed.  Where the mode of inheritance is known, this information is included on the linked disease page. The most popular breeds tend to have the most disorders listed because there is a larger number of dogs affected, and therefore more opportunity to recognize a breed predisposition to a particular disorder. As well, there is likely to be more indiscriminate breeding of these breeds, leading to a higher occurrence of inherited disorders. In less common or newer breeds, there may be no disorders listed or the list of disorders may be quite short, because it can take some time before enough dogs are affected to recognize an inherited condition.

The last category lists conditions that have been reported sporadically, and may be inherited in this breed.

1.jpg (6243 bytes)Most important
These disorders are relatively common in this breed, and where possible, efforts are being made to eradicate them. Ask your breeder about these conditions in his or her dogs. These disorders seriously affect the health of your pet and may require medical or surgical intervention.

Retinal dysplasia  http://www.upei.ca/~cidd/Diseases/ocular%20disorders/retinal%20dysplasia.htm

Seborrhea http://www.upei.ca/~cidd/Diseases/dermatology/seborrhea.htm


http://www.upei.ca/~cidd/breeds/cockerspaniel2.htm
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dfewdproud
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TRI-NATIONS KENNEL..HOME OF THE TRI-COLOR BULLIES


« Reply #4 on: May 20, 2009, 10:23:42 PM »

very nice post po sir!
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TRI-NATIONS KENNEL HOME OF THE TRI-COLOR BULLIES
amang
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« Reply #5 on: May 20, 2009, 10:28:06 PM »

very nice post po sir!

thanks sir!  Wink
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amang
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« Reply #6 on: September 10, 2009, 09:43:02 AM »

Skin Problems: Primary Keratinization Disorder or Primary Seborrhea

Primary seborrhea is commonly recognized in the cocker spaniel.  Primary seborrhea is caused by overproduction of skin cells including sebaceous (oil) cells.  The skin appears greasy and scaly with a foul smell.  The trunk, back, and ears are most commonly affected.  Itching varies among those affected. Diagnosis is done by biopsy.  Treatment includes the administration of retinoids (vitamin A derivatives) such as isotretinoin.  Concurrent treatment with antifungals may be indicated as primary seborrhea may be associated with yeast infection.  Routine use of antiseborrheic shampoos and moisturizers is also recommended
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niqi
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i am stupendous!


« Reply #7 on: September 10, 2009, 09:38:20 PM »

What is Seborrhea?

Seborrhea, dandruff, or scaly skin is a skin condition caused by excessive oil production of the skin cells and glands. This condition may either be dry scaliness (seborrhea sicca), oily (seborrhea oleosa) causing greasy and oily skin and hair, or greasy and flaky (seborrheic dermatitis). It manifests itself on the ears, stomach, elbows, armpits and ankles. Seborrhea is better known as dandruff.


What Causes Seborrhea?

Seborrhea is more common in dogs than cats. It may be hereditary based with breeds such as Cocker spaniels, Labradors, Dobermans, German Shepherds and Irish setters being more predisposed to it. Seborrhea may also be caused by allergies, parasites, bacterial and fungal infections, thyroid hormone deficiency, pancreatic disease or nutritional disorders. If left untreated, seborrhea can lead to severe skin infections.


Diagnosing Seborrhea

The diagnosis of seborrhea is based on the symptoms, thorough physical examination and review of your pet’s medical history. Certain diagnostic tests such as taking a skin swab and skin biopsy will be performed to rule out if a primary disease is the cause of cat or dog dandruff.


Help for Seborrhea

Depending on the type and cause of serborrhea, various anti-seborrheic shampoos and conditioners may be used. These shampoos should be left to lather on your pet’s skin for at least ten minutes before rinsing thoroughly. It is very important that you rinse properly and that no shampoo residue remains as this will only irritate the skin further.

Antibiotics and anti-fungal drugs will be prescribed for recurring yeast and bacterial skin infections which often accompanies seborrhea. Your vet may also recommend certain dietary changes together with omega-3 fatty supplementation as well as regular bathing of your pet.


Natural Remedies

More and more pet owners are choosing to use natural remedies for their pets. Homeopathic remedies have a long history of treating various skin conditions including feline and canine dandruff safely and effectively. Carefully selected ingredients such as Arum triph, Viola tri, Comocladia, Chamomilla and Cina soothe and calm symptoms and promote a healthy skin and coat.


http://www.nativeremedies.com/
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