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Author Topic: Pet First Aid  (Read 15915 times)
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Tita Sue
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« on: October 26, 2007, 11:07:07 PM »


First Aid Kit Checklist
 

Your veterinarian's phone number
Gauze to wrap wounds or muzzle animal
Adhesive tape for bandages
Nonstick bandages (i.e., Telfa pads) to protect wounds or control bleedingTowels and cloth
Hydrogen peroxide (3 percent)
Milk of Magnesia or activated charcoal to absorb poison (Be sure toget the advice of your veterinarian or local poison control center beforeinducing vomiting or treating an animal for poisoning.)
Large syringe without needle or eyedropper (to give oral treatments)
Muzzle (soft cloth, rope, necktie or nylon stocking ) or use a towelto cover a small animal's head. Do not use in case of vomiting.
Stretcher (A door, board, blanket or floor mat)

The American Animal Hospital Association advises that you contact your veterinarian immediately if your pet is injured or ill. First aid and the recommended first aid kit are not a substitute for veterinary treatment. However, knowing basic first aid could help save your pet's life.

 
 
« Last Edit: December 05, 2007, 09:06:05 AM by blubelle » Logged

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« on: October 26, 2007, 11:07:07 PM »

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Stungun
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« Reply #1 on: October 27, 2007, 08:06:07 AM »

Thanks for the info. If I may add I think its also good to have a wound spray around.
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« Reply #2 on: October 29, 2007, 03:51:46 AM »

add ko na rin, betadine  whatdoyouthink
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« Reply #3 on: October 31, 2007, 06:11:04 PM »

thanks bluebelle. napakahelpful neto.  Grin
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Tita Sue
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« Reply #4 on: October 31, 2007, 07:28:53 PM »

You're most welcome Smiley
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Tita Sue
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« Reply #5 on: December 05, 2007, 08:59:42 AM »

Just want to share this very informative article i found:

Pet First Aid
 
When your pet has an emergency, being prepared is very important. Before an emergency strikes, be sure you know how your veterinarian handles emergencies or where you should go if you have one. For example, some veterinarians always have someone on call, while others use special emergency hospitals for things that arise after hours. You can also stay prepared for emergencies by putting together a pet first-aid kit.

We cannot stress enough that you SHOULD NOT get on-line during a pet emergency or when your pet is seriously ill. In an emergency, first aid is not a substitute for veterinary treatment. However, before you are able to get your pet to a veterinarian, knowing some basic first aid can help. Always seek veterinary care following first-aid attempts.

Bite Wounds
Treatment/Action
Approach the pet carefully to avoid getting bitten. Muzzle the animal. Check the wound for contamination or debris. If significant debris is present, then clean the wound with large amounts of saline or balanced electrolyte solution. If these are not available, then regular water may be used. Wrap large open wounds to keep them clean. Apply pressure to profusely bleeding wounds. Do not use a tourniquet. Wear gloves when possible.

Bite wounds often become infected and need professional care. Call your veterinarian.

Bleeding
Treatment/Action
Apply firm, direct pressure over the bleeding area until the bleeding stops. Hold the pressure for at least 10 straight minutes (continually releasing the pressure to check the wound will hamper the clotting). Avoid bandages that cut off circulation.

Call your veterinarian immediately.

Breathing Stops
Treatment/Action
Check to see if the animal is choking on a foreign object. If an animal is not breathing, place it on a firm surface with its left side up. Check for a heartbeat by listening at the area where the elbow touches the chest. If you hear a heartbeat but not breathing, close the animal's mouth and breathe directly into its nose--not the mouth--until the chest expands. Repeat 12 to 15 times per minute. If there is no pulse, apply heart massage at the same time. The heart is located in the lower half of the chest, behind the elbow of the front left leg. Place one hand below the heart to support the chest. Place other hand over the heart and compress gently. To massage the hearts of cats and other tiny pets, compress the chest with the thumb and forefingers of one hand. Apply heart massage 80-120 times per minute for larger animals and 100-150 per minute for smaller ones. Alternate heart massage with breathing.

Please note: Even in the hands of well-trained veterinary health professionals, the success of resuscitation is very low overall. Success may be slightly higher in the cases of drowning or electrical shock.

Call your veterinarian immediately.

Burns(chemical, electrical, or heat including from a heating pad)
Symptoms: singed hair, blistering, swelling, redness of skin
Treatment/Action
Flush the burn immediately with large amounts of cool, running water. Apply an ice pack for 15-20 minutes. Do not place an ice pack directly on the skin. Wrap the pack in a light towel or other cover. If the animal has large quantities of dry chemicals on its skin, brush them off. Water may activate some dry chemicals.

Call your veterinarian immediately.

Choking
Symptoms: difficulty breathing, excessive pawing at the mouth, blue lips and tongue
Treatment/Action
Be sure to protect yourself as well as the animal, as the pet will likely be frantic and may be more likely to bite. If the pet can still partially breathe, it's best to keep the animal calm and get to a veterinarian as quickly as possible. Look into the mouth to see if foreign object in throat is visible. If you can, clear the airway by removing the object with pliers or tweezers, being careful not to push it farther down the throat. If it is lodged too deep or if the pet collapses, then place your hands on both sides of the animal's rib cage and apply firm, quick pressure. Or place the animal on its side and strike the side of the rib cage firmly with the palm of your hand three or four times. Repeat this procedure until the object is dislodged or you arrive at the veterinarian's office.

Call your veterinarian immediately.

Diarrhea
Treatment/Action
Withhold food for 12-24 hours, but not water. Sometimes pets that appear to be straining are sore from diarrhea rather than from constipation. Your veterinarian can help you decide which it is and what will help. Trying at-home treatments without knowing the real cause can just make things worse.

Call your veterinarian.

Fractures
Symptoms: Pain, inability to use a limb, or limb at odd angle
Treatment/Action
Muzzle the pet and look for bleeding. If you can control bleeding without causing more injury, then do so. Watch for signs of shock. DO NOT TRY TO SET THE FRACTURE by pulling or tugging on the limb. Transport the pet to the veterinarian immediately, supporting the injured part as best you can.

Heatstroke
Symptoms: Rapid or labored breathing, vomiting, high body temperature, collapse
Treatment/Action
Place the animal in a tub of cool water. Or, gently soak the animal with a garden hose or wrap it in a cool, wet towel. Do not overcool the animal. Stop cooling when rectal temperature reaches 103 degrees Fahrenheit.

Call veterinarian immediately.

Poisoning
Symptoms: vomiting, convulsions, diarrhea, salivation, weakness, depression, pain
Treatment/Action
Record what the pet ingested and how much. Immediately call your veterinarian or poison control center. Do not induce vomiting. In case of toxins or chemicals on the skin from oils, paints, insecticides and other contact irritants, request directions on if and how to wash the toxin off.

Seizures
Symptoms: salivation, loss of control of urine or stool, violent muscle twitching, loss of consciousness
Treatment/Action
Move the pet away from any objects that could be harmful during the seizure. Use a blanket for padding and protection. Do not put yourself at risk by restraining the pet during the seizure. Time the seizure. They usually last only 2 to 3 minutes. Afterwards, keep the animal calm and quiet.

Call your veterinarian immediately.

Shock
Symptoms: irregular breathing, dilated pupils
Treatment/Action
Shock may occur as a result of a serious injury or fright. Keep the animal gently restrained, quiet, and warm, with the lower body elevated.

Call your veterinarian immediately.

Vomiting
Treatment/Action
Withhold food for 12-24 hours. Give the pet ice cubes for two hours after vomiting stops, then slowly increase the amount of water and foods given over a 24-hour period.

Call your veterinarian.

If you need to muzzle your pet
Use a strip of soft cloth, rope, necktie, or nylon stocking. Wrap around the nose, under the chin and tie behind the ears. Care must be taken when handling weak or injured pets. Even normally docile pets will bite when in pain. Allow the pet to pant after handling by loosening or removing the muzzle. Do not use a muzzle in a case of vomiting. Cats and small pets may be difficult to muzzle. A towel placed around the head will help control small pets.

If your pet can't walk
A door, board, blanket, or floor mat can be used as a stretcher to transport injured or weak animals.

If your pet's emergency is not covered here, please call your veterinarian immediately.

 
 
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pepe
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« Reply #6 on: March 21, 2009, 02:55:18 PM »

This info is very helpful.  I'll have my vet's number on speed dial and posted on the fridge so my family can contact him in case of emergency
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« Reply #7 on: April 10, 2009, 02:13:44 PM »

Oh, plus hotspots remedy!
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« Reply #8 on: April 16, 2009, 12:20:08 PM »

wow galing yehey also decstrosepowder rin po whatdoyouthink
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Kloi
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« Reply #9 on: May 25, 2009, 01:30:09 AM »

Thanks for telling us
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« Reply #10 on: September 09, 2009, 12:12:56 AM »

Very informative indeed, Kudos !!!  ayos!
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melandshawn
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« Reply #11 on: September 25, 2009, 05:59:17 PM »

si pipoo ko po ngakaroon parang singaw sa bothsides ng mouth niya. hindi ko pa siya madadala ngaun sa vet kasi maraming utos yong boss ko sakin siguro mga nextweek pa sa sunday kasi walang pasok yong vet dito samin.

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melandshawn
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« Reply #12 on: September 25, 2009, 06:00:35 PM »



pwede ko po bang temporary na lagyan ng betadine? kanina ko lang nakita pagkapaligo ko sa kanya
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DogCrazy
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« Reply #13 on: March 18, 2010, 10:47:44 AM »

From Ruffwear - blog for outdoor dogs
http://dogblog.ruffwear.net/2009/10/21/make-your-own-canine-first-aid-kit/

make your own canine first aid kit
October 21, 2009


Ruff Wear has a saying around the office, “Better to haul precautionary items with you, than to lug a 60 pound dog back down with you.”  We are speaking, of course, in regards to ensuring that all the appropriate gear—including a dog first aid kit—makes it on your gear list for any outdoor adventure.

While many companies, including Ruff Wear, offer a pre-assembled first aid kit, you can make your own just as easily.  Here are a few key items that every canine first aid kit should have:

    * Pet First Aid Booklet (you can download a free version of our “Guide to Animal Emergencies” at: (http://www.ruffwear.com/dog_adventures/Trail-Adventures-with-Your-Dog)
    * List of important numbers such as your veterinarian and Poison Control
    * (2) 3” x 3” gauze pads
    * (1) 5? x 9? trauma pad
    * (1) 4? x 4.1 yd. stretch gauze? (can also be used as a muzzle to prevent biting during treatment)
    * (1) 2? x 5 yd. co-flex bandage
    * (1) pair latex gloves
    * (1) metal scissors
    * (?1) set of forceps? or tweezers
    * (4) PVP iodine swabs
    * (1) 20 ml bottle eye-skin wash
    * (2) insect swabs
    * (12) 1 g. hydro cortisone cream
    * (?4) 1 g. antibiotic cream
    * (5) cotton swabs
    * (2) antiseptic towelettes
    * (1) powdered styptic
    * (?2) green soap towelettes
    * (1) handiwipe
    * (1) 2? x 5 yd. adhesive tape
    * (1) 6? x 9? resealable bag
    * (?1) rubber band

Other helpful items:

    * (1) Magnifying glass
    * (1) thermometer
    * (1) oral syringe
    * (1 – 2 TBSP) 3% hydrogen peroxide, toxiban, or vet-approved charcoal—use to induce vomiting ONLY under vet’s guidance
    * (1mg / pound) Diphenhydramine Antihistamine (Benadryl)—use for allergic reactions ONLY under vet’s guidance

Finally, remember that contents of your first aid kit do have an expiration date.  Be sure to check and replace the contents of your kit often to ensure it’s ready if ever needed.
« Last Edit: March 18, 2010, 10:54:41 AM by DogCrazy » Logged

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« Reply #14 on: March 30, 2010, 10:36:14 PM »

Up ko to! I thank the Thread Starter and the Contributors.  thanks Have you read this thread, Guest? How many of us practically know what to do during Pet Emergencies? During dogwalks, may dala ba kayong First Aid Kit? Especially now that it's summer at andaming mga outing with our Dogs, alam ba natin ang gagawin kung may emergency? Do you really think you're ready for Trekking, Tailrunning or just a simple Dogwalk?

During the Dogwalk last Sunday I noticed one dog being bothered by a dead frog. Di mapakali yung Dog, tapos yun pala marami pang palaka na nagkalat. That's when Ma'am Dulce (Sir Jon's [Chocopeanut] wife) shared their experience nung muntik na daw mamatay si Kwek-Kwek (their Yellow Lab) dahil nalason ng palaka. I was asking myself, kung nangyari yung sa kahit sino sa aso ko, siguro di ko rin alam ang first aid. According to Ma'am Dulce, they were in an isolated rural area, talagang malayo sa bayan at di pa sigurado kung merong Vet sa nearest town. She said within 30seconds after Kwek-Kwek's encounter with the frog eh napahiga na lang daw at nagsimulang bumula ang bibig ni Kwek-Kwek. Ma'am Dulce said pinainom nila si Kwek ng maraming tubig na may sugar. And I thank Ma'am Dulce for sharing such experience, may natutunan ako. She said Kwek was able to recover later on that day. While posting the pic of Kwek-Kwek nung nagreRetrieve siya, you wouldnt know na may pinagdaanan siyang ganun. I felt so inadequate dahil I realized na kulang ang aking nalalaman tungkol sa Pet Emergency. And so I did a little homework. While on our way back to Manila, I was asking Doc Tin and Mariel kung ano mga gagawin in cases of pet emergency. I learned a lot from both of 'em. I thank them for the helpful tips. And I guess PPF is lucky that we have Doctors and Pet Experts around during Dogventures.

Tama nga ang sabi nila, prevention is better than cure.

Ikaw, Guest, alam mo ba ang gagawin mo sa cases ng Heatstroke, or Bloat or kung nabangga ang furkid mo? Basta ang alam ko, tulad ng laging sinasabi ng Fire/Emergency Officer kong kapatid, IN CASE OF EMERGENCY, ALWAYS REMEMBER THE NUMBER 1 RULE: Do not panic. Madaling sabihin, mahirap gawin pag andiyan na. But knowing is still half of the battle.
« Last Edit: March 30, 2010, 10:38:31 PM by labdawg05 » Logged

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